2017 Art list – with narrative

 

See below images and words from last year’s contributors.

Select page:   (1-50)   |   (51-100)   |   (101-150)    |   (151-200)

Silent tears

“this is for my farther. we looked after him at home for 3 months at the end of his life.”

Author: Shobna Mistry

Family love

This piece reflects family love. Family is really important and I think they will treasure something I’ve made for them. it represents how important family is to me. They are always in my thoughts.

Author: Sue Houghton

Sunset

This piece is inspired by Trevor Wells, month painter. Painted during art sessions at my local hospice.

Author: Dorothy Ganguly

The art of dying

As a Macmillan Nurse I feel this word art depicts the feelings, emotions and experiences associated with “end of life” and the journey patients, relatives and friends embark on at this time.

Author: Pamela Booth

Miss You (Fabric – use of socks and lace)

A best friend is not just for Christmas…but for infinity and beyond.

Author: Debbie Smith

When a feather falls

White feathers fall from the sky and I am reminded of those close to me that have passed away.

Author: Helen Adamson

Holding With Open Hands

This poem looks at some of the things I learnt about myself whilst ill with depression some years ago. Its roots are in the loss of my dad to pancreatic cancer when I was 11, the deeply embedded thought patterns that development from that, and the long road to discovering that I am loved.

Author: Katherine Lesueur

Life: brief intermission between birth & death (A)

Death is not the greatest loss in life, it is the void that resides after life. We are only human for a short while. We often forget to appreciate the unseen beauty. Silence most of all.

Author: Amany Elsayed

Life: brief intermission between birth & death (B) 

Death is not the greatest loss in life, it is the void that resides after life. We are only human for a short while. We often forget to appreciate the unseen beauty. Silence most of all.

Author: Amany Elsayed

Life: brief intermission between birth & death (C) 

Death is not the greatest loss in life, it is the void that resides after life. We are only human for a short while. We often forget to appreciate the unseen beauty. Silence most of all.

Author: Amany Elsayed

Path of life

Depiction of different stages of life.

Author: Ashley House

Spirit of the light

From my meditation to the spirit realms and a beautiful spirit who welcomed me there. To give me peace.

Author: Louise Potie

The next step

I am a reiki healer and used my meditations and healing. My View of death, not to be afraid.

Author: Louise Potie

Daddy’s Girl

Loss of daddy.

Author: Erin Hughes

Life Cycles

The participants chose the theme of caterpillars and the butterflies to represent Life Cycles. The theme highlights that death brings about transformations and change and as with the passing seasons, that eventually there is hope and life moves on.

Author: Sam Parkin

Spirit in the Sky

Pressed funeral flowers from my mum’s casket.

Author: Sara Bullows

Calacas

Created by pupils from Romiley Out of Hours School Club, Stockport ages 3-11 years.

Author: Romiley out of hours school club

A nice cup of tea

A cup of tea is a vital part of every day life for the majority of people in modern Britain. Tea is so integral to our routine, that it is difficult to imagine life without it!

When a loved one of friend dies it is often very difficult to know what to say or do but a nice cup of tea and a chat helps to make everything seem better.

Author: Ellen Scowcroft

Snowdrops

“Snowdrops were my mum’s favourite flower, and it’s fitting that they start to bloom at the same time of the year as she was born and passed away. It looks like a macroshot, but was in fact taken with a telephoto lens from about 6ft away”.

Author: Tom Gradwell

Sealed within a whisper

Sealed within
A whisper – ‘I love you’
My last, lasting breath
It belongs to you
They all belong to you
With every single breath
I loved you

Author: Stewart Beveridge

Daffodils that come before the swallo dares and take the winds of march with beauty

Daffodils are hardy perennials that die but come back again. The daffodil symbolises rebirth and new beginnings, and is virtually synonymous with spring.

Author: Fiona Stirling

Your never too old and its never too late

Watching this lady fulfil her ambition of completing a TransAtlantic crossing gave me inspirational and belief that it is never too late to achieve your dreams.

Author: Nicky Norris

Dancing with death 

Th is artwork is created with oi I paints on a wooden frame and is of an abstract style.

The intention of the artist is to present the synergy and complexity that is at the heart of life or the dance with death that is such an integral part of living. In all of our living we address an interface with death. In the mist of life there is death. In the midst of death there is life. It is a daily dance. Regan O’Callaghan is an Anglian Priest and full time artist living and working in London.

Author: Jeremy Law

Butterfly Boards

This was a collaborative project undertaken by staff, patients, relatives and friends of Ward 36. We asked people to create a butterfly which depicted their feelings and what was important to them in regards to end of life care. We chose the butterfly template as it a Trust symbol of palliative care.

Author: Ward 36 CMFT

Celebration of Life – Our Shining Star

We as a whole team have created this piece of art to represent our beautiful colleague Sandra’s life. The bright colours on this piece represents the good times we had with her, as she was full of light in making others happy. Light colours remind us of love, care, fun and happiness, which she was every second, every minute of our lives. Always having fun in life and making us all cheerful as she was full of sparkle. RIP Sandra we miss you Shining Star.

Author: Abbey Hey District Nurses CMFT

A collaboration of emotions

Sharing emotions makes us stronger…

Author: Wendy and Jane

Stolen moments

“From my own experience, art adds colour and perspective, when skies are grey … ”

Author: Shanali Perera

Change

Two watercolour paintings to express the changing roles between this mother and daughter and the change in emotions that come with this process as both grow older together.

Author: Liam Owen

Tile 1 David
Tile 2 Three Wise Men
Tile 3 Job
Four Stages of Life. APOC

David (Tile 1)
A biblical tale on a tile depicting standing up to fare. My Mum was my inspiration for this piece. Me hearing she had cancer. The day shifted and cancer became a real issue.

Three Wise Men (Tile 2)
A biblical tale on a tile depicting a gift to mankind. Caring for others. The inspiration of where I work at the NHS. Feeling of being in the right place to be able to give what is required from us.

Job (Tile 3)
A biblical tale on a tile, love ones. Losing family that’s close to you. It represents faith and eternal love. It evokes good memories good thoughts. Love always.

Four Stages of Life. APOC
The white horse represents the birth and the conquest of life. The red horse represents the peace we have and don’t have. The black horse represents are balance and deeds. Finally, the fourth horse, The pale rider, represents our final stage: Death by famine or plagues or by the sword.

Author: Errol Sahadeo

Passing

The idea of passing on being assimilated back into the World. The Kimono presents the physical body melting into the environment. The soul turning into a crane – Indian symbol of freedom – the gnarled blossom tree – rebirth. Mt Fuji in the background -a place of the Spirits.

Author: Tracy Hamrang

Dad’s Jumpers

Dad wasn1 t born a rich man by any means and just enjoyed the simple things in life like a pint of Boddingtons bitter and his favourite Frey Bentos pie for Sunday dinner. He worked as a domestic for many years at Crumpsall Hospital and was always very proud of his cleaning skills. However as he got older he developed a taste for the more 1 finer1 things in life where his clothing was concerned. He would only buy underwear from Marks and Spencers and jumpers from British Home Stores.

Dad’s jumpers became an important part of his older years as we came to see Dad dress in only 3 jumpers, which meant mum was constantly washing them (only using Persil and Comfort fabric softener!!). When Dad died Mum had this very special teddy bear made out of Dads 3 favourite jumpers which now has its own very special place in my house and is a constant wonderful reminder of Dad.

Author: Susan Heatley

Water to Water

I was recently discussing this subject with a friend and she agreed with me that when we die,
we should have our ashes spread on a favourite stretch of water.

Thinking how the body is almost 60% water and we originally came from the water millions of years ago, then it seems a fitting way to end of our days and be returned to the water.

So I painted this to honour those wishes, the places and locations of those waters will be attached to the back the work.

Author: Angus Carolan

Legacy

This piece of art represents the fact that at the end of life we are much more than just a patient.

I talked with patients about their greatest achievements, what they are most proud of and what they want

to be remembered for.

This gave us the inspiration for the wrist band labels.  Other patients contributed by collaging the arms.

By using a variety of skin tones and several wrist bands we aimed to portray society as a whole.

Author: Rachel Carter and Patients on Ward 6 CMFT

Don’t Wait

The piece is intended to encourage people to contemplate both how they want to live their life, in addition to how much they have considered their own death and dying.

The hearts falling through the hourglass represent the beating heart, designed to invoke thoughts around the inevitability of death.

Author: Catherine Preston

New Beginnings

This piece represents the concept that the end of one thing leads to the beginning of another. Spring comes from the end of the Winter, and sometimes moving forward means leaving the past behind, however, we all leave behind a legacy.

Author: Sarah Pendlebury and Amanda Whitefoot CMFT

Poem

This poem was written in an attempt to express some of my emotions around the birth and death of my day old son, Benjamin. It also reflects my belief that love lives on, through death, and into eternity.

Author: Sarah Brewerton

Deadpool

i’m 11 years old, and in this painting I have tried to capture my perception of death and what it means to me.

as an 11 year old boy, I have never experienced death, so my closest understanding towards this subject is from films and comics. “Deadpool” is a comic book character who cannot die, so my piece reflects invulnerability and my lack of real world understanding of death.

Author: Max Cooper

Teddy’s Rug

This was made just after Mum was diagnosed with dementia.

When I visited her at her home we hooked the rug together. We had no idea at that time it would be used in the grandchildren’s room, and would hold precious memories for my son and me

Author: Marilyn Glos and deceased mother Elsie Johnson

My Friend Joe 

Joe was a very old man who used to live in my Granny Sue and Granddad’s village. He used to come and play Lego with me and talk to me about animals.

He is buried in the local Church and every time we visit Granny Sue and Granddad we go and say hello.

Author: Toby Andrews

Will’s Uni Blanket

I started the blanket for Will to go to university and did bits whilst watching him play rugby.

After my diagnosis of breast cancer, it became something I had to finish for him. My hair loss in chemo has maybe added to the warmth factor of the blanket. It kept me focused – a labour of love for Will.

Author: Kirsty Ince

A Grief Expressed – Precious Poems 

These two poems were written to help express the grief I felt when my parents died. Firstly my Mum in 2005; having vascular dementia, I felt we lost her twice; first losing my ‘real Mum’, then later, losing the Mum ‘she became’ – hence two poems.

A wise friend once siad to me “things will get back to normal, they will just be ‘a different kind of normal'” – that’s exactly how it felt.

Ten years later, my Dad also sadly died. It felt like the end of an era. ‘A heavenly Melody’ reflects the enormous part music played in his life.

Author: Sarah Booth

A Grief Expressed – Precious Poems 

These two poems were written to help express the grief I felt when my parents died. Firstly my Mum in 2005; having vascular dementia, I felt we lost her twice; first losing my ‘real Mum’, then later, losing the Mum ‘she became’ – hence two poems.

A wise friend once siad to me “things will get back to normal, they will just be ‘a different kind of normal'” – that’s exactly how it felt.

Ten years later, my Dad also sadly died. It felt like the end of an era. ‘A heavenly Melody’ reflects the enormous part music played in his life.

Author: Sarah Booth

The Memories of You 

This piece represents how losing somebody gives us the opportunity to remember all of their idiosyncrasies and the memories that make up a person and their life.

The home made feel shows the collection of personal experience and the comforting warmth of the quilts and home.

Through memory we can never truly lose somebody.

Author: Phoebe Raine

Untitled

This mixed media painting conveys the scientific outlook on life and death. The representation of the bones beneath the skin highlights the natural perception of death with ought the emotional attachments. The bones signify death and decay as it is usually what is left after the body decomposes.

The contrast of colour between the hand and the bones is also a significant attribute as it portrays the colour and vibrancy associated with life compared to death.

Author: Finn Johnson

The Album 

When I was young I was a member of a band and music was, and still is, important to me. I didnt continue with playing but as my 60th birthday approached I set myself a challenge of taking guitar lessons and learning to play properly. I made a video of me playing to celebrate my birthday and my achievement. I was struck by how much my parents enjoyed watching that video.

Recording the CD of some of my favourite plays was a goal I set myself… I suppose I was looking to leave some sort of legacy to my kids, and doing something I really enjoyed seemed a good way to do it. I imagine that a my funeral a piece of my music may be played , which would be nice. So there are probably loads of subconscious reasons why I did it, so I have no objection to you using it if you think it would inspire someone to do something that they love, or they could be remembered by

Author: Alan Malone

My Grandpa

My Grandpa died in February this year. He is the first person I have known to have died.

It is really hard to think that I will never see him again.

Author: Molly Andrews

Star Quilt

A quilt made of scraps of various fabrics. My quilting has always been my relaxing hobby, though at times during Brian’s illness it was hard to concentrate on anything else.

I made this star pattern quilt in my quilting group, Gleneagles Ps & Qs, during November 2015 to help me with Brian’s illness. Brian passed away in October 2016. I called this quilt “what a star Brian was!”

Author: Janette Smith

I Remember My Grandma

This piece is a written word piece representing my memories of my Grandma. It was to keep my memories of her alive and just reminds me of all the things she did and gave up for us.

It also makes me realise how her life really mattered to us, as did her death.

Author: Jean Rogers

Hello and Goodbye 

We had been trying for a baby for many years, going through all sorts of procedures. I finally got pregnant and we were so pleased and happy.

When I lost the baby very soon after the first scan, we were devastated. I wrote this poem as an acknowledgement that she/he had really existed, unborn but not unloved

Author: Roo Lumb

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