Art list – with narrative

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Every Name, Every Story

A photograph taken to capture the
number of people that pass away on a
daily basis. As a healthcare professional,
the emotion needs to be suppressed to
work effectively but it’s still important to
remember each individual has a story.

Author: Michelle Clark

The Winter Garden

During dormant season in 16th.c Leiden,
Clusius ensured his students had continuity of
botanical details from drawings in his “Winter
Garden” – a florilegium made from plants in his
systematic beds.
My wife, Rakiyah, created her Winter Garden
from 400 drawings I made during rehabilitation
following my early retirement.
Chinese practitioners used Podophylum
hexandrum for 2000 years to treat cancer. This
drawing featured in my last RHS exhibition in
2001 while I was undergoing radiotherapy for
prostate cancer.
Rakiyah died in 2010. Her Winter Garden
remains as a florilegium of memories from her
garden, its plants and activities we enjoyed
together. Manchester. March 2017.

Author: Michael Beswick

No Transition Is Permanent

No state is permanent, everything is
in a state of flux. Dying is just
another transition; one that we all
must pass through.

Author: Leslie Robert Bush

Visitations

A plague doctor was a physician who treated
victims of the plague. Some doctors wore a
beak like mask filled with aromatics designed
to protect them from infection. What a
frightening sight to behold on your death bed.
In the last days of her life my mother
responded less to the doctors and visitors
around her. I distinctly remember she started
seeing her “Granny Fisher” the woman who
brought her up. There was no fear present
when my mother died and I find comfort in the
idea that maybe we all have our own visitor to
see us safely out of this world.

Author: Lisa Wong

Untitled

My piece is an arrangement of items gathered
during a walk on Formby beach-a place I
associate with childhood days out with my
grandparents. I like the idea of bringing new
purpose to something that has expired, or died.
Nature brings me perspective-that our lives are
part of something much bigger and in a sense
we never really die, we just take on a new form.

Author: Abigail Betton

Keep Going

Let your eyes shine bright, only through tears of laughter.
Don’t drape yourself in morning and blacken your view.
Hold your head high and feel my kiss each morning.
Talk to me still and share your troubled heart.
Be happy thatI’m still on my journey.
Hold tight my dear and love your own life.
Until at last our paths will cross again.

Author: Sarah Ward

In My Life – I know I’ll often stop and think about them…

I grew up listening to the Beatles and the lyrics to this song evoke so many memories from the past.

How certain places have changed or disappeared, and it makes me realise how quickly life changes and passes by.

This is a photograph of one of those places, the woods that I use to play in as a child.

Author: Rebecca Taylor

Tree Of Life

Learning to create, craft and make was a huge part of time spent with my gran. Using bits from her button box to create the ‘tree of life’ not only evoked lovely memories but created a lasting piece that includes a part of her.

Author: Tammy Marsh

Living on

This is a picture of me and my great-grandma.

My great-grandma was born in the late 1890s, she had a tough start to life; being put in to a workhouse as a child. Unfortunately she died before I was born, but the stories that have lived on about her make me feel like I know her (she sounds a character!)

I also feel a connection with her because her genes have lived on in me! – we look very similar and unfortunately I have inherited her chin! (thanks a lot great-grandma!!!)

Author: Rebecca Taylor

My Dad

My dad  was such a lovely man, he was gentle and kind.

This poem represents some memories of my Dad.

Author: Denise Woolrich

Daffodil

David Emlyn Jones was my dad. A Welshman. Probably the only Welshman not able to sing!

He moved to Manchester when he was 19 years old and so that he would fit in up here he purposely lost his accent, so did not sound Welsh at all. I am very proud of my Welsh heritage, much to my husband’s annoyance, especially where rugby is concerned. Being half Welsh I support the Welsh national team when they are winning!! I have always loved daffodils, maybe that is genetic!! When my dad died I got a tattoo of a daffodil, close to my heart! Dad died in the month of March so we were able to have lots of daffodils at the funeral, he would have liked that.

Walking With Old Friends, Gone But Not Forgotten

Some of my happiest memories are going for walks with my parents and grandparents.

A walk was never just a walk it was an adventure of learning about the countryside, my dad loved a free meal so we would come home laden with, blackberries, wild plums, crab apples, bilberries, herbs, mushrooms, and the next few days were spent making Jam, Wine, chutney’s.

We learned things without even knowing it was a lesson it was such good fun. If nothing was in season to pick we walked and talked and things pointed out, birds, flowers, trees, look where this is growing smell it taste it remember where it is.

We still walk as a family; we pick the fruits and make jam and chutneys. We know where to look when to look and what to look for this is because of our friends and family who taught us, now passed away but not forgotten, this thumb stick (walking stick) is decorated with flowers and leaves with the engraved names of the people who we love, who have shared their knowledge with us, not forgotten and who will now come walking with us once again, tales will be told to my grandchildren, tales that were told to me, will be passed to them to pass on.

Author: Christine & Rachael Spragg

Cherish

Cherish….Dying Matters

Comes one day,
all of a sudden,
usually without no warnings.

Have to accept without a say,
have to accept reluctantly.

Everyone’s time will come.

Resistance is not an option,
some are happy to bow down.

It may come as a relief from life turbulences,
an escape from poor health,
freedom from dire wealth,
no more ups and downs of life,
as life is no more.

Surely what are left behind are precious abiding memories.

Hold on to them, ‘Oh loved ones!’ and CHERISH.

Author: Jalaluddin M Shah

Turquoise Top

What has this Turquoise Top seen?
If it could speak it would tell you of a scene, a knock on the door,
Quick Dads collapsed
I ran round to his house, you can be sure of that

Rapid response, flashing blue lights
My Dad dead on the floor
All too much to take in

So what does death and dying mean to me?
A heart broken in a moment
A parent never more to be seen
A Dad gone forever, never more to be

I take care of my children, all adults now
And make the most of my time with them to make memories
As they don’t realise the heartbreak in a moment
When it will be my scene

Turquoise Top lives in my wardrobe
Too precious to throw away
It reminders me of my Dads last day

Author: Christine Taylor- Daughter of Arthur

Something Old…Someone Missing

Dear Dad,

I’m sorry you weren’t there to give me away at my wedding but you were with me always in your ring mum let me wear. Your grandson Rhys did a great job in your place and would have made you very proud. You would love Andy, my new husband, though you wouldn’t get a word in as he talks a lot and you were a man of few words. We skipped down the aisle to Stevie Wonder which would have made you smile. We missed you on this special day but we do every day.

Love Caroline xxx

Author: Caroline Mattinson

Heartbeat

Growing up my dad always said me and my sister should create something to send in to Tony Heart’s ‘Heartbeat’ show, for the gallery with Morph. We intended to collect chocolate wrappers and create a collage however we did well at eating the chocolates but never got round to creating the art. Unfortunately my dad died suddenly from a heart attack when I was 19 and in that moment life changed forever. At an early age I realised you have to make the most of every day as life is short.

For this project I finally got round to making that art. The star signifies my dad and the heart in the middle is how quickly life can change ‘in a heartbeat’. Make the most of each day and what it brings.

Author: Elaine Parkin

These Streets We Walk

Some thoughts which inspired Winnie Bajulaiye’s poem

We often don’t think that our stay on earth is for a time; there is a time to be born and a time to die; a time to plant and a time to uproot, so the book of Ecclesiastes tells us. So, when I go walking, I find myself taking in the sights, smells and the sounds on my walks; and on one of such days, these thoughts crept into my mind – “when a person passes on, they will not walk through what was once familiar streets and places again”.

Sad

This painting was created to show a visible representation of the invisible feelings of being in a fragile, lonely and dark place.

The face is placed off centred on the canvas to represent wanting to hide away and not to be “centre stage”.

I wanted to focus just on the head being trapped in a hazy darkness. The body is not represented as the mind has taken over and not able to “switch off”.

The crackled effect on the skin represents the fragility of the person.

The face is not making eye contact as they are immersed in their own pain to engage fully with anyone else.

Although this painting is focusing on a moment that is painful I do want to show with this piece that it is a “frozen moment” in time.

The face will emerge forward out of the hazy darkness of the canvas.

Author: Rebecca Taylor

Helping Hand

The photo is of my Mum in her late stages.

The drawing of the hand represents the support or “helping hand” shown to me by Macmillan Nurses and the poem is of how they made me feel at that time.

The scripture Isaiah 41:10 from the bible is my ongoing “helping hand” from my heavenly Father who tells me not to be afraid, supports me and has hold of my hand tight as a loving Father would to his child.

Author: Patricia Taylor

A Letter to My Daughter

A letter to my daughter……

Dearest Kim, Paul and Nathan,

You will get this letter at the end of my life on this earth. I want you to know how happy you have made me, you brought our lovely Nathan into the world, and we’re having so much pleasure from him. Thank you for the lovely 60th party, and the many social events, meals out and at your home as a family. We have all had to bear the loss of our dear Joe, but you have made me able to carry on. I know you will be happy always as a family, you are lovely people. Stay close with our Alex and Michelle, for my sake. I’m not afraid of going to another home, I know I will see our dear Joe, as I will my mum and other loved ones.

Now I’ll say I love you all.

Mam xxx

I have always been very proud of you all xx

Author: Jean Leach, beautiful and adored mum of Kim Wrigley

Elisabeth Kubler Ross and the Loss of My Mother (artwork 1/5)

Elisabeth Kubler Ross is a renown psychologist who coined the “Five Stages of Grief” following the experience of bereavement in 1969. I felt that I identified with these stages myself after the sudden loss of my mother from a brain haemorrhage in 2004. The five images depict my movement through these stages following my loss:

  1. Denial
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

I chose lyrics from popular music that incites the feelings of these five stages for me personally, and added them accordingly.

I completed this work in the hope that others can identify with these images too…and to let others know that there is light at the end of the tunnel when we lose those who are important to us.

Author: Simon Ashcroft

Elisabeth Kubler Ross and the Loss of My Mother (artwork 2/5)

Elisabeth Kubler Ross is a renown psychologist who coined the “Five Stages of Grief” following the experience of bereavement in 1969. I felt that I identified with these stages myself after the sudden loss of my mother from a brain haemorrhage in 2004. The five images depict my movement through these stages following my loss:

  1. Denial
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

I chose lyrics from popular music that incites the feelings of these five stages for me personally, and added them accordingly.

I completed this work in the hope that others can identify with these images too…and to let others know that there is light at the end of the tunnel when we lose those who are important to us.

Author: Simon Ashcroft

Elisabeth Kubler Ross and the Loss of My Mother (artwork 3/5)

Elisabeth Kubler Ross is a renown psychologist who coined the “Five Stages of Grief” following the experience of bereavement in 1969. I felt that I identified with these stages myself after the sudden loss of my mother from a brain haemorrhage in 2004. The five images depict my movement through these stages following my loss:

  1. Denial
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

I chose lyrics from popular music that incites the feelings of these five stages for me personally, and added them accordingly.

I completed this work in the hope that others can identify with these images too…and to let others know that there is light at the end of the tunnel when we lose those who are important to us.

Author: Simon Ashcroft

Elisabeth Kubler Ross and the Loss of My Mother (artwork 4/5)

Elisabeth Kubler Ross is a renown psychologist who coined the “Five Stages of Grief” following the experience of bereavement in 1969. I felt that I identified with these stages myself after the sudden loss of my mother from a brain haemorrhage in 2004. The five images depict my movement through these stages following my loss:

  1. Denial
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

I chose lyrics from popular music that incites the feelings of these five stages for me personally, and added them accordingly.

I completed this work in the hope that others can identify with these images too…and to let others know that there is light at the end of the tunnel when we lose those who are important to us.

Author: Simon Ashcroft

Elisabeth Kubler Ross and the Loss of My Mother (artwork 5/5)

Elisabeth Kubler Ross is a renown psychologist who coined the “Five Stages of Grief” following the experience of bereavement in 1969. I felt that I identified with these stages myself after the sudden loss of my mother from a brain haemorrhage in 2004. The five images depict my movement through these stages following my loss:

  1. Denial
  2. Anger
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

I chose lyrics from popular music that incites the feelings of these five stages for me personally, and added them accordingly.

I completed this work in the hope that others can identify with these images too…and to let others know that there is light at the end of the tunnel when we lose those who are important to us.

Author: Simon Ashcroft

Mortals and Mortality

When I was 80 years of age I was accepted at Salford University to do a Masters Degree in Fine Art. As the oldest on the campus my first project was about ‘Mortals and Mortality’ and this piece formed part of the work I created.

Author: Jim Giles

“Heaven or Hell” –Who Can Tell?

A rhyming poem about myself as I grow olderknowing I’ve been good and bad in my life. I turn 66 on the 8thof April 2017. Since 1999 it has all been good for me,so Iponder if I’m to go to Heaven or be sent to Hell. I gave up alcohol, I now volunteer and I hope the gates of Heaven will accept me.

Author: Charles Wesley McDermott

Sunset/Sunrise?

think art is very much like death and loss;it affects and is perceived differently by everyone.When I started this piece I was reminded of the hymn,“I watch the sunrise (Close to you)”,to me this encapsulate show I see life and death. It is a natural cycle that whether you believe in God or not,death will happen to usual and to those around us.I have faith that there is something after this life and take strength from this.When you look at my picture you can choose if you see Sunset or Sunrise

Author: Natasha Lamb

Bluebell Wood Pexhill

Created in beginner’s Art Class at the Day Centre at the Local Hospice.

Author: Dorothy Ganguly

Dark Trees

Beginner’s piece created at the Day Centre at my Local Hospice.

Author: Hazel Aimson

Mary and Jesus

Contemplation and mindfulness  while painting has helped me in many ways dealing with terminally ill patients at the Local Hospice.

Author: Olga Probert

Archangel Gabriel

Painting Icons allows me time for meditation and spirituality of the work. It enables me to cope better with patients who are terminally ill at the Local Hospice.

Author: Olga Probert

Hand Painted Silk Scarf

Present for my Daughter who has been s good through my illness.

Author: Christine Stanley

The three muses

At their age they have all been affected by death. They will all have lost someone. My sister died at the hospice last year. The woman on the left in the blue hat is like my grandma. She had a flask like that.

Author: Denise Gleaves

Girl with bucket

“she has all her life ahead of her. She’s not touched by death…carefree.”

Author: Denise Gleaves

Girl with bird

“this is a picture of my daughter. It is a memory of a holiday we had. A little bird flew into the caravan window and she picked it up. It died in her hands. It shows how tender hearted she is. It’s about anguish of loss and show her empathy about death.

Author: Denise Gleaves

One day at a time

“I was thinking about work and people dying and how they approach life. I was thinking about my Dad.”

Author: Dawn Ruby

A picture with no name

Imagination is hard work, especially now.
I always have the sense of something given.

I try to remember the names of colours.
In the days of art and study, handing paint.
was so much easier. Not now though.
This all came together, capturing the light

Shimmering in the finest rain. It surrounds
Without touching. I am reminded of the street behind
my home. A sense of place. When the butterfly arrived it seemed
quite finished. It says what I wanted it to say.
I will leave it here for you.

Author: Cindy Bolton

Why does my death matter

Why does my death matter?
Because of these children
Three of them have children
And grandchildren of their own
Where will my family tree end?

Author: Brian Stott

Hospice life

This is a collaborative piece of the art that was worked on by patients, staff and volunteers and Bolton Hospice. The vibrant colour represent the different aspects of care and support provided to patients and their families and the abstract technique reflects and celebrates the vitality and exuberance of life at the hospice. It is a celebration of life, living and laughter!

Author: Bolton Hospice

Girl with bucket

“She has all her life ahead of her. She’s not touched by death…Carefree”

Author: Denise Gleaves

Untitled

I took this photograph on a trip to Chatsworth House and Gardens. I wanted to capture thsi moment because it reminded me of my grandfather who died from dementia. The leaves memories slowly falling away and the man looking out on the bridge waiting to take his first steps of a new journey.

Author: Felicity Ransom

Butterfly Canvass

This art piece would raise more awareness towards infant loss in multiple pregnancies. It represents all the beautiful babies that lost their life in multiple pregnancies. Millie smith came up with the idea of having the purple butterfly stockers on the cost of infants in neonatal intensive care unit to identify when a baby had survived the death of a multiple sibling. Millie chose a butterfly because “it was fitting to remember the babies that flew away.” I am currently waiting to get a place at university to study midwifery. Bereavement has always been close to my heart. I hope to specialise in bereavement once qualified. I want to help raise awareness as much as i can around infant loss. Having suffered an infant loss within the family support is a crucial part of the grieving process and sadly there is a lack of it.

Author: Haldana Morton

Love you for ever

This is a sentiment I share with my daughter Samantha. We have a very special relationship. She was really ill when she was 10. We had 3 gruelling years of treatment at the Christie and it’s put a different slant on life. I’ve volunteered for the hospice since before it opened. it’s my way of putting something back. i’m so grateful and thankful.

Author: Jacqueline Dando

Definition of dying through the eyes of nurses

“What I do in my job is important to me. It’s a caring profession, I know I’m in the right job. I would like to be treated as it says in the artwork, to die with dignity and respect and cared for right to the end.”

Author: Lynda Varney

Life moves on

The wood is from a beautiful old elm tree that was diseased and had to come down. The porcelain symbolises new growth. It’s symbolic of new growth coming from something that’s died and that life moves on.

Author: Melanie Walton

Cottage Garden

I did this for my mother when she had to move into a granny flat and she no longer had her garden.

Author: Melanie Walton

Waiting for the wife

This is a homage to my farther. He worked in newspapers all his life. He died in the 1970s aged 57 of leukaemia. I had been married just 6 months. He used to wait for my Mother for ages whilst she was trying on dresses in shops. He was a very patient man. I was privileged to have him in my life as long as i did.

Author: Melanie Walton

For my family

For my family

Author: For my family

Calm

“leaving this behind is important as it would be something I had done with love and reflected my beliefs. It reflects me and what my personal beliefs are and my view of life in that I think the picture is calming and that all situations can have stormy times but each finds calm at some point. I have had many occasions of stormy hard times but my personal belief in a higher energy which guides, protects and supports you in times of sadness and difficulty. this work had been many colours which I feel reflected what was occurring in my life at the time but ended calm. The journey of life, death to dying is hard for everyone but you can always find a calm and inner peace and as a nurse you can help patients and families with this and you learn from them and feel quite humbled.

Author: Sheila Archibald

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